What are clinical trials, and why are they important?

 

Clinical trials are research studies that are the final step in a long process that began with research in a lab. Most treatments used today are the results of past clinical trials. If you or a loved one needs treatment for cancer, ask about clinical trials. They are available for all stages of cancer-not only for people who have advanced cancer that is not responding to treatment. With so many new methods to treat cancer, such as targeted immunotherapy, clinical trials are the first step in bringing powerful, successful new methods to market.


Clinical Trials FinderStand Up To Cancer has provided this resource for you to register with the Clinical Trials Finder, a free and confidential cancer clinical trial matching and referral service operated by EmergingMed. Clinical Trial Navigators are available to guide you through the search process AND notify you know when new studies open that match a specific profile.


Coaltion of CancerThe Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups is a unique nonprofit organization with one mission, improving patient awareness of cancer clinical trials, facilitating access, and promoting participation. Through innovative programs and services, the Coalition examines and confronts key issues impeding cancer research.


Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 11.20.20 AMClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world. Learn more about clinical studies and about this site, including relevant history, policies, and laws.



GUMDROP
is a nonprofit created to enhance patient outcomes through greater cancer clinical trial awareness. The website is intended to help all in the cancer community to filter through the current clinical trials that apply to bladder, kidney and prostate cancers. It is hoped that improved clinical trial awareness and utilization will lead to improved survival.


nci-logo-englishClinical trials are essential for moving new methods of preventing, diagnosing, and treating cancer from the laboratory to physicians’ offices and other clinical settings. NCI has a broad array of programs that support clinical research, including programs that facilitate the development of new interventions, from the initial creation of candidate drugs in the lab to final testing in late-stage clinical trials. Read more about NCI’s clinical trials programs and initiatives. In addition, here is a 10-step guide called : How to Find a Cancer Treatment Trial.


The National Cancer Institute as the National Institutes of Health has put together the following information:Every trial has a person in charge, usually a doctor, who is called the principal investigator. The principal investigator prepares a plan for the trial, called a protocol. The protocol explains what will be done during the trial. It also contains information that helps the doctor decide if this treatment is right for you.

The protocol includes information about:

  • The reason for doing the trial
  • Who can join the trial (called “eligibility requirements”)
  • How many people are needed for the trial
  • Any drugs that will be given, how they will be given, the dose, and how often
  • What medical tests will be done and how often
  • What types of information will be collected about the people taking part

Clinical trials are key to developing new methods to prevent, detect, and treat cancer. It is through clinical trials that researchers can determine whether new treatments are safe and effective and work better than current treatments. When you take part in a clinical trial, you add to our knowledge about cancer and help improve cancer care. They are the final step in a long process that begins with research in a lab. Most treatments we use today are the results of past clinical trials.

Cancer clinical trials are designed to test new ways to:

  • Treat cancer
  • Find and diagnose cancer
  • Prevent cancer
  • Manage symptoms of cancer or side effects from its treatment

Any time you or a loved one needs treatment for cancer, clinical trials are an option to think about. Trials are available for all stages of cancer. It is a myth that they are only for people who have advanced cancer that is not responding to treatment.

Every trial has a person in charge, usually a doctor, who is called the principal investigator. The principal investigator prepares a plan for the trial, called a protocol. The protocol explains what will be done during the trial. It also contains information that helps the doctor decide if this treatment is right for you. The protocol includes information about:

  • The reason for doing the trial
  • Who can join the trial (called “eligibility requirements”)
  • How many people are needed for the trial
  • Any drugs that will be given, how they will be given, the dose, and how often
  • What medical tests will be done and how often
  • What types of information will be collected about the people taking part
Why Are Clinical Trials Important?

Clinical trials are key to developing new methods to prevent, detect, and treat cancer. It is through clinical trials that researchers can determine whether new treatments are safe and effective and work better than current treatments. When you take part in a clinical trial, you add to our knowledge about cancer and help improve cancer care.

Perhaps you are thinking about participating in a clinical trial. Or maybe you have a friend or family member with cancer and are wondering if a clinical trial is right for them.

In this section you will learn: